exclusively-positive-press:

This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree

It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x]


Hey, look, REAL photos!!!!




[photo source]
#news  #green  #environment  #algae  #France  #lamp  #science  #biochemistry  #Pierre Calleja  #invention  #innovation 

exclusively-positive-press:

This lamp absorbs 150 times more CO2 than a tree

It’s still in the “so crazy it just might work” stage, but these microalgae-powered lamps, invented by French biochemist Pierre Calleja, could absorb a ton of carbon from the air every year. That’s as much as 150 to 200 trees. [x]

Hey, look, REAL photos!!!!

[photo source]

#news  #green  #environment  #algae  #France  #lamp  #science  #biochemistry  #Pierre Calleja  #invention  #innovation 

zooborns:

Roger Williams Park Zoo Welcomes Endangered Tree Kangaroo

Roger Williams Park Zoo in Rhode Island has just announced the birth of a Matschie’s Tree Kangaroo, born in October last year. The female joey, named Holly, is the first tree kangaroo birth at the zoo in over 20 years, and one of only one of three born in captivity in the U.S. last year.

[rwpzoo | zooborns]

27 May 2014 ♥ 12,570 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from fizzyliftingdrank    source: bit.ly
mothernaturenetwork:

Watch a polar bear cub take his first steps
The 2-month-old cub at the Toronto Zoo hasn’t quite nailed walking, but he’s definitely got being cute figured out.
Watch the video.

mothernaturenetwork:

Watch a polar bear cub take his first steps

The 2-month-old cub at the Toronto Zoo hasn’t quite nailed walking, but he’s definitely got being cute figured out.

Watch the video.

Scholars Discover New Poems from Ancient Greek Poetess Sappho

Only a few poems of the Greek poetess Sappho’s work have survived but thanks to a leading scholar’s investigation two new works have just been recovered—and gives experts hope to find more.

Read more.

Scholars Discover New Poems from Ancient Greek Poetess Sappho

Only a few poems of the Greek poetess Sappho’s work have survived but thanks to a leading scholar’s investigation two new works have just been recovered—and gives experts hope to find more.
nbcnews:

Brain surgeon walked six miles during snowstorm for emergency operation
(Photo: NBC News)
Not a snowstorm, a traffic jam or a daunting six-mile walk through fresh powder could stop an Alabama neurosurgeon from getting to the hospital where he was needed for emergency surgery.
Continue reading.

nbcnews:

Brain surgeon walked six miles during snowstorm for emergency operation

(Photo: NBC News)

Not a snowstorm, a traffic jam or a daunting six-mile walk through fresh powder could stop an Alabama neurosurgeon from getting to the hospital where he was needed for emergency surgery.

Continue reading.

28 March 2014 ♥ 1,317 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from nbcnews
mothernaturenetwork:

Message in a bottle from 1959 found in remote Arctic area
The content of the bottle’s message gave its finders ‘goose bumps.’

mothernaturenetwork:

Message in a bottle from 1959 found in remote Arctic area

The content of the bottle’s message gave its finders ‘goose bumps.’

breakingnews:

Panda cub Bao Bao makes public debut at National Zoo
NBC Washington: 5-month-old panda cub Bao Bao made her public debut at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to a crowd of eager spectators.
The zoo says the panda house will be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Visitors will be allowed into the building in small groups to avoid overcrowding.
Bao Bao may be visible inside or outside, depending on the day, curators said. The amount of time she and her mom, Mei Xiang, will be on view will depend on their behavior each day.
Photo: AP File Photo via NBCNews.com

breakingnews:

Panda cub Bao Bao makes public debut at National Zoo

NBC Washington: 5-month-old panda cub Bao Bao made her public debut at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., on Saturday to a crowd of eager spectators.

The zoo says the panda house will be open from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sunday and Monday. Visitors will be allowed into the building in small groups to avoid overcrowding.

Bao Bao may be visible inside or outside, depending on the day, curators said. The amount of time she and her mom, Mei Xiang, will be on view will depend on their behavior each day.

Photo: AP File Photo via NBCNews.com

28 March 2014 ♥ 4,592 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from breakingnews
Connecticut Now Requires Health Insurers To Cover Gender Transition ›

shortformblog:

A big victory for trans rights: A lot of insurance companies refuse to cover gender reassignment surgery, but Connecticut ruled last week that all insurers in the state have to cover both the surgery and other treatments related to gender dysphoria, including hormone therapy and counseling. The determination was based on two existing laws: One banning discrimination based on gender identity, and one requiring insurers to cover mental health treatment. Gender dysphoria is listed as a mental health disorder in the latest DSM; while there are a lot of reasons one could reasonably be upset about this, the upshot is that it gave the Connecticut Insurance Department additional legal justification for bolstering the rights of trans folk in the state. 

27 March 2014 ♥ 1,477 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from shortformblog
discoverynews:
Water Plume ‘Unequivocally’ Detected at Dwarf Planet Ceres
Astronomers analyzing data from the now defunct Herschel infrared space observatory have made a huge discovery deep inside the asteroid belt. Dwarf planet Ceres, the largest body in the region, is generating plumes of water vapor.
Read more.

discoverynews:

Water Plume ‘Unequivocally’ Detected at Dwarf Planet Ceres

Astronomers analyzing data from the now defunct Herschel infrared space observatory have made a huge discovery deep inside the asteroid belt. Dwarf planet Ceres, the largest body in the region, is generating plumes of water vapor.

Read more.

12 March 2014 ♥ 474 notes           Reblog    High-Res
reblogged from discoverynews
breakingnews:

Remains of King Alfred the Great believed to be found
Archaeologists say they may have found the pelvis bone of King Alfred the Great, who ruled England from 871 to 899 AD.
The team who exhumed the unmarked grave at a church in Winchester say they believe the bone is either that of Alfred or his son Edward the Elder.
Read more from ITV News.
Photo: The King Alfred statue in Winchester (Chris Ison / PA Wire)

breakingnews:

Remains of King Alfred the Great believed to be found

Archaeologists say they may have found the pelvis bone of King Alfred the Great, who ruled England from 871 to 899 AD.

The team who exhumed the unmarked grave at a church in Winchester say they believe the bone is either that of Alfred or his son Edward the Elder.

Read more from ITV News.

Photo: The King Alfred statue in Winchester (Chris Ison / PA Wire)

11 March 2014 ♥ 322 notes           Reblog    High-Res
reblogged from breakingnews
Meet Afghanistan's first female police chief: Mother-of-five Jamila Bayaz ›
11 March 2014 ♥ 241 notes           Reblog    
reblogged from shortformblog

Fishermen cast their nets over a flooded paddy field on the outskirts of Agartala, the capital of India’s northeastern state of Tripura, May 26, 2010. [REUTERS/Jayanta Dey]

Ancient farming seen curbing extinctions of animals, plants

Ancient farming practices, such as raising fish in rice paddies in China or Aboriginal Australian fire controls, will get a new lease of life under plans to slow extinctions of animals and plants, experts said on Monday.
Turning to traditional farming is seen as a way of limiting what U.N. studies say is the worst spate of extinctions since the dinosaurs vanished 65 million years ago, driven by a rising human population that is wrecking natural habitats.
Read more.

Fishermen cast their nets over a flooded paddy field on the outskirts of Agartala, the capital of India’s northeastern state of Tripura, May 26, 2010. [REUTERS/Jayanta Dey]

Ancient farming seen curbing extinctions of animals, plants

Ancient farming practices, such as raising fish in rice paddies in China or Aboriginal Australian fire controls, will get a new lease of life under plans to slow extinctions of animals and plants, experts said on Monday.

Turning to traditional farming is seen as a way of limiting what U.N. studies say is the worst spate of extinctions since the dinosaurs vanished 65 million years ago, driven by a rising human population that is wrecking natural habitats.

Read more.

8 March 2014 ♥ 18 notes           Reblog    High-Res
    source: reuters.com